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Thursday, January 31, 2013

Home Is Where the Heart Is #16Patty Andrews dies at 94

 
 

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Because they're no squares, the Andrews Sisters harmonize at home on a round bed.

Meanwhile, Patty Andrews has gone on to sit with her sisters under that big old apple tree in the sky. Read the New York Times obit here.

 
 

Things you can do from here:

 
 

HONEYMOON FROM HELL (Worcester Post Jan 31, 1933)




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Wednesday, January 30, 2013

01271933 FIREMEN RESCUE JOE CONNOR'S ROLL OF $$$




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Monday, January 28, 2013

WEEKLY PERSPECTIVE ~Benjamin Thompson



The Week's Perspective: Benjamin Thompson Efq. View in Browser
The Weekly Perspective- Newspaper Archive
ISSUE 3 January 25, 2013
The Featured Article
An Excerpt from "The German Theatre" Written by Sir Benjamin Thompson

Benjamin Thompson thoughts about German theatrics:
"Antithetical points, poetical prettiness, elaborate and unimpassioned dialogue, and the rules of Aristotle, Horace and Bossu, are totally neglected."

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Find out more about who Benjamin Thompson was...
An article written in the Febuary 10th, 1998, Kerrville Daily Times, Texas, gives us a glimpse as to who Thompson was.
Pioneer of Thermodynamics.

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See What The Market Was Like In the 1980's The Electric Wizard

Read up on U.S. Stock Market trends, and a look at the strength of the European Market.

Remembering Another Great American Figure. "Thomas Edison Praised As One Who Bettered World For Humans"
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Saturday, January 26, 2013

SWEEPING VICTORY BY DE VALERA (1/26/33)




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Subject: 01261933
Date: Fri, 18 Jan 2013 14:06:43 -0500

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Friday, January 25, 2013

CHIEF FOLEY ORDERS COMMUNIST CHECKUP! (1/15/33)





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Thursday, January 24, 2013

SALARY CUTS SAVE STATE 900K (Worcester Post Jan 24, 1933)






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Tuesday, January 22, 2013

FALL KILLS HOSPITAL EMPLOYEE (Jan 22,1933)





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Monday, January 21, 2013

BEMIS RETIRES / ALLEN-SQUIRE PRODUCTION RESUMES (JAN 1933)





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AUTO SHOW HEAD DIES AFTER SPEECH (80 yrs ago today)






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Sunday, January 20, 2013

FIFTEEN YEAR OLD DAGMAR WEARING A PRETTY DRESS IN CHICAGO, ILLINOIS




bmarshphd posted: "This cabinet card features a teenage girl posing at the studio of photographer Anton Rohde of Chicago, Illinois. She is wearing a pretty wheat stalk print dress. The attractiveness of the dress is  not apparent because the photographer chose a backdrop th"
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New post on THE CABINET CARD GALLERY

FIFTEEN YEAR OLD DAGMAR WEARING A PRETTY DRESS IN CHICAGO, ILLINOIS

by bmarshphd

DAGMAR_0002This cabinet card features a teenage girl posing at the studio of photographer Anton Rohde of Chicago, Illinois. She is wearing a pretty wheat stalk print dress. The attractiveness of the dress is  not apparent because the photographer chose a backdrop that clashes with the dress. I would give him no prizes for this particular portrait but the printing on the bottom of this cabinet card indicates that Rohde had been a winner of awards for some of his other  photographs. One of the displayed awards was received in 1888, and the other award was from the Photographers Association of America. The reverse of the photograph has an inscription which states "To Gini" and lists the subjects name as "Dagmar" and her age as fifteen years and eight months. Anton Rohde was once partners in a photography firm called Rohde & Schutz which was located at the same address that produced this photograph. He also was once  located at 88 West Ohio Street. He is listed in the 1892 and 1900 Chicago business directories. Research located his obituary which indicates that he died in 1917 at the age of fifty-five. He was survived by his wife, Augusta Rohde.

bmarshphd | January 20, 2013 at 12:01 am | Tags: Anton Rohde, Chicago, Illinois | Categories: Women: Non Theatrical | URL: http://wp.me/pnHKU-2NW

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EIGHTY YEARS AGO TODAY (20 JAN 1933)




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Saturday, January 19, 2013

CLOTURE, KIDNAPPING, MURDER AND SORE THROAT (Jan 19, 1933)






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Friday, January 18, 2013

ONE FLU OVER THE CUCKOO'S NEST (1918)

Thanks to Al Southwick for his years and years of great local history in his books and on the pages of the Worcester Telegram and Gazette.

THREE KILLED IN HOLLYWOOD LIQUOR WAR





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Thursday, January 17, 2013

SPENCER WOMAN HURT IN CHERRY VALLEY CRASH






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Wednesday, January 16, 2013

POLICE BLAME UNDERWORLD (Jan 16, 1933)





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Tuesday, January 15, 2013

BAD COP BOOTED (January 15, 1933)




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Monday, January 14, 2013

LEGISLATIVE PROBE OF TROOPERS URGED (Jan 14, 1933)





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JANUARY 1973 ~ THE PARIS PEACE ACCORDS



fold3: Military records
This Month in History: January 1973 - The Paris Peace Accords
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Fold3 This Month in History

The Paris Peace Accords

Forty years ago, on January 23, 1973, President Richard Nixon addressed the nation and announced an agreement "to end the war and bring peace with honor in Vietnam." The agreement had been finalized earlier that day by Henry Kissinger and Le Duc Tho. Both men received the 1973 Nobel Peace Prize for "arranging the ceasefire after negotiating for nearly four years."
A few days later, representatives from the United States, the Democratic Republic of Vietnam (North Vietnam), the Republic of Vietnam (South Vietnam), and the Provisional Revolutionary Government formally signed the "Agreement on Ending the War and Restoring Peace in Vietnam," in Paris on January 27, 1973.
Provisions of the Paris Peace Accords included an immediate ceasefire beginning at the end of that day, January 27, with all American forces to be withdrawn from South Vietnam within sixty days. Additionally—and also within sixty days—all prisoners of war were to be released and a full accounting of those missing in action was to be made. Also, negotiations were to continue between the three Vietnamese entities to provide a peaceful solution to reunify Vietnam.
The war in Vietnam began in 1955 and, while it ended for the United States with the Paris Peace Accords, the issues regarding prisoners of war, those missing in action, and the return of remains were contentious and controversial, dragging on for decades, and perhaps still not totally resolved today. North and South Vietnam had agreed to begin negotiations to peacefully settle their differences, yet fighting continued until the fall of Saigon on April 30, 1975. It wasn't until 1976 that North and South Vietnam were united as one nation.
The Vietnam War is memorialized on Fold3 in The Vietnam Collection through Army and Marine Corps photos, Unit Service Awards, and the Interactive Vietnam Veterans Memorial. We encourage you to leave a tribute to any of the men and women who served their country in America's longest war.
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Civil War Collection 150th Anniversary
150th Anniversary
(1863–2013)
This Month in the Civil War: The Emancipation Proclamation
The Emancipation Proclamation, one of the most pivotal documents of the Civil War, was issued by President Abraham Lincoln on January 1, 1863. Earlier, on September 22, 1862, Lincoln had issued a preliminary proclamation that if fighting did not end and the South did not return to the Union by January 1, 1863, that all slaves in those Confederate states would be free. This was the first time that the war was officially defined as a fight against slavery.
In addition to freeing slaves in states and parts of states supporting the Confederacy, Lincoln, as commander in chief, proclaimed that "such persons of suitable condition, will be received into the armed service of the United States to garrison forts, positions, stations, and other places, and to man vessels of all sorts in said service," opening the way to blacks serving in the military. (Explore the Service Records of U.S. Colored Troops on Fold3.)
Additional and related documents are available in the Civil War Collection on Fold3, including records relating to the Emancipation of Slaves in DC in April 1862, and Court Slave Records for DC, 1851-1863, in which you can find emancipation and manumission papers.
The National Archives, one of Fold3's publication partners, has created a free eBook in honor of the 150th anniversary of the Emancipation Proclamation. The Meaning and Making of Emancipation can be downloaded from this page.
Find your Civil War ancestors on one of the largest Civil War collections online.
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Sunday, January 13, 2013

SENATORS CUT BEER! (cut the crap!) 13 Jan 1933






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