Saturday, November 16, 2013

Fwd: The Massachusetts Observer





The Massachusetts Observer


America and American Defined

Posted: 15 Nov 2013 06:49 AM PST


Massachusetts Observer Radio presents programs from the past that shine light on the present.

Our program today is from the series called "The Free Company." In 1941, a group of American actors, writers, musicians - a whole production company volunteered their services and talents to produce a program about America and Democracy. The Columbia Broadcasting System, CBS, joined with them.

Today's episode is titled "The People with Light Coming Out of Them." It's the story of an American neighborhood - perhaps best summed up by the Latin phrase E Pluribus Unum - "out of many, one." Out of many states, a great nation, a single nation is formed; and out of many backgrounds (races, religions, ethnicities) what it means to be an American is defined.

For your consideration and, we hope, inspiration, Massachusetts Observer Radio presents "The First Company" and the episode titled, "The People with Light Coming Out of Them." (Please click on the title).
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OLD SCHOOL PHOTO (1903)

BOSTON GLOBE ARCHIVE http://bostonglobe.com
 Nov. 3, 1903: The mother house of the order of Les Souers de l'institute de l"enfance Jesus et Marie purchased St. Joseph's parochial school and and St. Joseph's Convent on Harbor Street for $75,000. In addition to establishing a mother house here the nuns taught at St. Joseph's parochial school
. November 3 1903: The mother house of the order of Les Souers de l'institute de l"enfance Jesus et Marie purchased St. Joseph's parochial school and and St. Joseph's Convent on Harbor Street for $75,000. In addition to establishing a mother house here the nuns would teach at St. Joseph's parochial school.

Friday, November 15, 2013

Fwd: The Massachusetts Observer




The Massachusetts Observer


Segregation Inc., Washington, D. C.

Posted: 14 Nov 2013 02:31 AM PST

Washington, D.C.
Massachusetts Observer Radio brings programs from the past that shine a light on the present.

In 1949 the "Destination Freedom" series broadcast an episode titled "Segregation Incorporated." The program departed from its usual dramatization format to a straight documentary about segregation in our nation's capital, Washington, the District of Columbia.

Anyone wanting to know the feelings and attitudes toward segregation in Washington, D.C. in 1949 must include this program as a primary, contemporaneous source.

Massachusetts Observer Radio proudly provides this forum for "Destination Freedom's" "Segregation Incorporated."

Access this program via Massachusetts Observer Radio's YouTube Channel.
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Tuesday, November 12, 2013

Fwd: The Massachusetts Observer



The Massachusetts Observer


Radio for the Intellectually Curious

Posted: 11 Nov 2013 09:25 PM PST



Our programs on Massachusetts Observer Radio appeal to those who are politically aware and have a curiosity about historical precedence to current prevailing modes of political thought.

Today's program is an episode of "America's Town Meeting of the Air." It was first broadcast in 1940 from Miami, Florida. The subject is "What is Youths' Role in Defense of Democracy?"

You'll hear two distinct and opposing points of view, one from Dr. George B. Cotton, President of Colgate University, and the other from Democratic United States Senator from Florida, Claude D. Pepper.

Franklin D. Roosevelt is President, and The New Deal is being carried out. We believe you will find many of the arguments taken by both sides quite familiar.

Here comes the Town Crier. Let's go in.

Please view this video on YouTube and consider subscribing to the Massachusetts Observer Radio Channel. Thanks!


A Program for Veterans Day

Posted: 10 Nov 2013 06:36 AM PST

Tuskegee Airmen


This is a special Veterans Day presentation on Massachusetts Observer Radio where programs from the past shine light on the present.

Today we go back to World War 2. For years African Americans had been trying to break the color barrier in the U. S. military. This program, "The Treasury Star Parade," dramatizes one such success.

Capable and motivated young black men had tried but failed to become pilots in The United States Air Force. Facing prevailing attitudes at the time, policies that included the odious Jim Crow Laws prohibiting the mingling of the races, The Tuskegee Institute, Tuskegee, Alabama, produced the first black squadron, The Tuskegee Airmen.

In 1943, "The Treasury Star Parade," a government-sponsored series produced to encourage the public to purchase War Bonds, dramatized the story of Lieutenant Charles H. DeBow.

Massachusetts Observer Radio is honored to present this episode titled "I Got Wings."


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Monday, November 11, 2013

Joe DiMaggio


Introducing the Honor Wall



On Saturday, November 9, 2013 12:18 PM, Fold3.com <team@fold3.com> wrote:
fold3: Military records
Introducing the Honor Wall
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Introducing the Honor Wall

Introducing the Honor Wall

Unveiled this week in honor of Veterans Day, the Fold3 Honor Wall pays tribute to millions of men and women who served our nation, from colonial days to the present.
We invite you to visit the Honor Wall and help us pay tribute to America's veterans by sharing your own memories, stories, and photos of a loved one. Whether you have family or friends serving now, or have ancestors who fought in the Revolutionary War or other conflicts in between, join us in commemorating them. With your help, the Honor Wall will keep their stories alive.
The Honor Wall hosts millions of names, yet it's just the beginning of a monumental tribute that will grow through your contributions. We've redesigned the Fold3 Memorial Pages to include representations of service, along with life events, photos, stories, documents, and connections to family members.
Search for those you know—ancestors, friends, fellow service members, family members, or perhaps you! If you find who you're looking for, add your own dedication. If you can't locate a Memorial Page for someone,create one of your own and add it to the Honor Wall. It's easy!
Just follow the prompts to choose the conflict in which someone served, then add more facts about the individual, including military service. The "Find more records" button will even give you links to possible matches to records on Fold3, Newspapers.com, and Ancestry.com.
Once you've contributed to the Honor Wall, let others know. Choose the "Share" link at the bottom of any Memorial Page. Spread the word, and help us commemorate all of America's heroes.
View sample Memorial Pages for ideas of how you can create or add to your family's pages.
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Sunday, November 10, 2013

Fwd: The Massachusetts Observer




The Massachusetts Observer


The Mammy Legend

Posted: 08 Nov 2013 01:39 PM PST


Once again it is time for an episode of Massachusetts Observer Radio where you hear programs from the past that shine a light on the present.

What do you think of when you hear the word "Mammy"? She's been sung about; she's been portrayed in movies and on radio and television; and she's been used to sell products.

The "Mammy" is the stereotype of the contented female slave. She happily devotes all of her time to her white "family" at the expense of her own. She mothers the white children and does the cooking, the cleaning, the washing - all with a broad grin on her face.

In 1944, the radio series "New World A-Coming" took on this "Mammy" depiction squarely. It was still very much in vogue in 1940's white culture and in many ways exists in our present day in the minds of some people. Justification for racism never seems to go out of style.

Here, then, for your consideration, Massachusetts Observer Radio presents the 1944 broadcast of "New World A-Coming" titled "The Mammy Legend."


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LENIN, LINCOLN & SPIKE LEE? (St.Petersburg street scene)


Saturday, November 9, 2013

September 2, 1941




From: wpl_scanpro02@worcpublib.org
To: tqnews@hotmail.com; trrytrvrs@gmail.com
Date: Wed, 3 Apr 2013 15:09:26 -0400
Subject: September 2, 1941

-->

Devens Picketer Discharged




From: wpl_scanpro02@worcpublib.org
To: tqnews@hotmail.com
Date: Sat, 26 Oct 2013 11:11:19 -0400
Subject: Devems Picketer Discharged

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Jews Incorporate Sex Ed in Religion Classes / Viet Nam Buildup




From: wpl_scanpro02@worcpublib.org
To: tqnews@hotmail.com
Date: Sat, 26 Oct 2013 11:11:19 -0400
Subject: jew sex ed

-->

#GOLD SWINDLE ~ SYLVIA PORTER




From: wpl_scanpro02@worcpublib.org
To: tqnews@hotmail.com
Date: Sat, 26 Oct 2013 11:11:20 -0400
Subject: beck gold

-->

AT THE THEATERS (1965)




From: wpl_scanpro02@worcpublib.org
To: tqnews@hotmail.com
Date: Sat, 26 Oct 2013 11:11:20 -0400
Subject: 1965 films

-->

TMIH - Kennedy Assassination



On Saturday, November 2, 2013 1:28 PM, Fold3.com <team@fold3.com> wrote:
fold3: Military records
This Month in History: JFK Assassination
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Fold3 This Month in History

JFK Assassination

The assassination of John Fitzgerald Kennedy, the 35th president of the United States, is an iconic tragedy seared into the consciousness of anyone living that day: November 22, 1963. Even those who weren't born yet, or were too young to remember the event, know the history, have seen the headlines, or have watched video footage of how an assassin's bullet shattered a man, his family, and a nation.
News spread quickly. Within hours, hurried accounts of the event were published in the papers.
"President Kennedy has been assassinated. He was killed today by a bullet in the head while riding in an open car through the streets of Dallas. His wife was in the same car, but was not hit. She cradled the President in her arms as he was carried to a hospital where he died." (The Brownsville Herald)
"Lying wounded at the same hospital was Gov. John Connally of Texas, who was cut down by the same fusillade that ended the life of the youngest man ever elected to the presidency." (Lake Charles American-Press)
"President Lyndon B. Johnson wears a somber expression moments after he was administered the oath of office in the cabin of the presidential plan at Dallas Love Field." (The Bridgeport Telegram, photo caption)
There's more, of course.
A brief account here cannot adequately commemorate Kennedy, describe the events of that day and the weeks that followed, nor describe the impact his assassination had on the country. This month, fifty years later, first-person accounts and moving tributes will fill our news feeds, make their way to television, and absorb our attention in private and public venues.
Fifty years later, we at Fold3 commemorate Kennedy's legacy beyond his tragic and untimely death. We join the world in paying tribute to the life and memory of John Fitzgerald Kennedy.
Visit John F. Kennedy's Fold3 Memorial Page.
Explore headline news from November 22, 1963, and the days that followed, on Newspapers.com.
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Civil War Collection 150th Anniversary
150th Anniversary
(1863–2013)
This Month in the Civil War: The Gettysburg Address
Seven score and ten years ago, on November 19, 1863, President Abraham Lincoln addressed those gathered at the dedication of the Soldiers' National Cemetery in Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, with this historic phrase: "Four score and seven years ago our fathers brought forth upon this continent, a new nation, conceived in liberty, and dedicated to the proposition that 'all men are created equal.'" It was the preamble to one of the most remarkable speeches in U.S. history.
Unlike many presidential speeches, it was brief and direct. In honoring men from both sides of the war, Lincoln stressed that "the brave men, living and dead, who struggled here, have hallowed" the ground and that "these dead shall not have died in vain." The final phrase is nearly as memorable as the first: "… that government of the people by the people for the people, shall not perish from the earth."
View a draft of the Gettysburg Address in Fold3's American Milestone Documents.
Find your Civil War ancestors on one of the largest Civil War collections online.
Explore now »
The Journey Through Hallowed Ground Partnership's Living Legacy Project is bringing President Lincoln's vision to full fruition. This nationally significant initiative will plant one tree for each of the 620,000 soldiers who fell during the American Civil War and share the individual stories of those that fought and died. To learn more about how you can be part of this click here.
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Friday, November 8, 2013

Fwd: The Massachusetts Observer




The Massachusetts Observer


New World A-Coming

Posted: 06 Nov 2013 04:50 AM PST


It's a new episode on Massachusetts Observer Radio where we bring you programs from our past that shine light on the present.

Jim Crow. Perhaps you've heard the name. It was used to describe laws that segregated whites from African Americans in the former Confederate States, the Southern states.

Colored waiting rooms, Whites Only restaurants, Colored entrances, Whites Only water fountains -well, you get the idea. And lest anyone think that this meant "separate but equal," then you need to hear today's program.

New World A-Coming was broadcast during 1945-46. It was based on the 1943 book of the same name by Roi Ottley which is subtitled "Inside Black America."

Today's story titled "White Folks Do Some Funny Things" dramatizes the experience of living under Jim Crow as seen through the eyes of poet and author Langston Hughes.

Langston Hughes is portrayed by actor Canada Lee whose own biography is quite impressive. His devotion to Civil Rights eventually led to his being placed on the Hollywood Blacklist - names of those accused of being Communists or having Communist sympathies. Canada Lee refused to "name names." He was scheduled to appear before the House Un-American Activities Committee, but he died before the date. He was 45 years old.

Here is "New World A-Coming" from 1945 and the episode titled "White Folks Do Some Funny Things."


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Tuesday, November 5, 2013

#USMC is 238 November 10

@v@ 
 0



fold3: Military records
This Month in History: November 1775 The Continental Congress Establishes a Corps of Marines
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Fold3 This Month in History

The Continental Congress Establishes a Corps of Marines

November 10, 1775, was officially recognized as the birthday of the United States Marine Corps through Marine Corps Order No. 47 in 1921. The order proudly states:
"From the Battle of Trenton to the Argonne, Marines have won foremost honors in war, and in the long eras of tranquility at home, generation after generation of Marines have grown gray in war in both hemispheres and in every corner of the seven seas, that our country and its citizens might enjoy peace and security."
On November 10, 1775, the Continental Congress resolved, "that two Battalions of marines be raised," and that they "be able to serve to advantage by sea when required" and "that they be distinguished by the names of the first & second battalions of American Marines." A copy of the full resolution is in the Papers of the Continental Congress on Fold3.
Unlike the Navy, which served only at sea, the first Corps of Marines was formed from infantry units deployed both at sea and on shore. Their first successful mission was at Fort Nassau in the Bahamas, March 3-4, 1776. Although disbanded in 1783 after the Revolutionary War, the U.S. Marine Corps was reestablished on July 11, 1798. The original date of November 10, 1775, continues to be celebrated by Marines around the globe today.

Happy 237th birthday, USMC!

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Civil War Collection 150th Anniversary
150th Anniversary
(1862–2012)
This Month in the Civil War: General Burnside Heads Army of the Potomac
General Ambrose Burnside was named Commander of the Army of the Potomac in November 1862, replacing General George McClellan who continued to disappoint President Lincoln with his strategic weaknesses, and most especially for failing to pursue General Lee's retreating army after the Battle of Antietam. Burnside had been asked to take the position on two previous occasions but modestly felt he was not suitable.
Burnside attended the Military Academy at West Point, served in Mexico City during the Mexican-American War, and distinguished himself in several Civil War battles before his appointment as Commander of the Army of the Potomac. Unfortunately, it was a short-lived appointment, as he was replaced by General Joseph Hooker in January 1863 after the Battle of Fredericksburg and a second offensive that failed due to miserable winter conditions.
Burnside's portrait is easily recognized, as he sported distinctive mutton-chop whiskers which connected to a moustache, but no beard. His last name was turned inside out and applied to the style. As a result, such facial hair has been called "sideburns" to this day.
Find your Civil War ancestors on one of the largest Civil War collections online.
Explore now »
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